Pretty pictures, my own rambling, and not much else.

1st October 2014

Photo reblogged from The Chrons with 2,166 notes

Source: iron-v

1st October 2014

Photoset reblogged from a balloon salesman named Sid with 209,053 notes

mstrkrftz:

Mille, the Norwegian Forest Cat | Jane Bjerkli

Source: mstrkrftz.com

1st October 2014

Photo reblogged from It Is What It Is with 2,321 notes

nichvlas:

Seealpsee (by yweibel)

nichvlas:

Seealpsee (by yweibel)

Source: nichvlas

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from TECT0NIC with 3,899 notes

sublim-ature:

Lonely Bison at Grand Prismatic Spring by Michael Liu

sublim-ature:

Lonely Bison at Grand Prismatic Spring by Michael Liu

Source: sublim-ature

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from a balloon salesman named Sid with 3 notes

past:

(via More dark inspiration - desire to inspire - desiretoinspire.net)

past:

(via More dark inspiration - desire to inspire - desiretoinspire.net)

Source: desiretoinspire.net

30th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from People of Color in European Art History with 791 notes

medievalpoc:

Stephen Slaughter

Portrait of Two Society Women

England (c. 1740s)

Oil on Canvas, 123 x 100 cm.

The Wadsworth Atheneum, Ella Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection. See Also: Ellis K. Waterhouse, The Dictionary of British 18th Century Painters in Oils and Crayons (Woodbridge, England, 1981), p. 348.

Of course you can find many images of Slaughter’s portraits in high resolution and full color online at multiple sites, but of course, not THIS one. Never this one. I wonder why. :|

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from People of Color in European Art History with 2,774 notes

medievalpoc:

Alessandro Longhi
Portrait of a Young Black Man
Italy (c. 1760s)
Oil on Canvas, 75 x 65 cm.
The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University
[x] [x]

medievalpoc:

Alessandro Longhi

Portrait of a Young Black Man

Italy (c. 1760s)

Oil on Canvas, 75 x 65 cm.

The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

[x] [x]

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from a balloon salesman named Sid with 842 notes

w-i-t-c-h-e-r-y:

The cutest!

w-i-t-c-h-e-r-y:

The cutest!

Source: autumncozy

30th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Marco Mazzoni with 314 notes

marcomazzoni:

The Fisherman on minimoleskine ( Thinkspace Gallery )

marcomazzoni:

The Fisherman on minimoleskine ( Thinkspace Gallery )

29th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Dammit Jim! I'm a doctor, not a hetero! with 18,441 notes

kyssthis16:

be-blackstar:

communerd:

Can’t stop, won’t stop (9.22): Updates from tonight’s town hall are slow coming due to the virtual media black out, but it seems like the name of tonight’s game was “Pass the Buck.” Hard to heal when no one’s willing to take responsibility for their wrongs. #staywoke #farfromover 

okay but how can they even begin to deny having military gear when there are literally hundreds of pictures of cannisters and riot gear???

I MEAN…

is this some semantic-based loophole?! 

"Our police department doesn’t use or possess tear gas, rubber bullets, stingers, or any of the items used during protest." 

So are they admitting those items were used during the protests? Or are they saying “we don’t use them during protests [but we didn’t consider those times protests]” 

Like what in the holy fuck is happening? 

Okay, Clarification: The City of Ferguson probably doesn’t have any military equipment. HOWEVER, St. Louis County does and Ferguson is a municipality in St. Louis County and is allowed to borrow and allocate resources from general county resources (including police officers from other municipalities; the “Go Fuck Yourself” Cop was from St. Ann). Just a point of reference: there are 90 municipalities in St. Louis County. 

Remember, the police presence during the main protests were a mixed bag of Missouri State Highway Patrol, Ferguson PD, St. Louis County PD, and other “borrowed” cops from neighboring municipalities. It’s also why it’s so insidious that they didn’t wear their name-tags or badges. Pure fuckery.

Source: socialjusticekoolaid

29th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Quiet You! Can't You See I'm Giving A Soliloquy? with 114,001 notes

obviouslybenhughes:

jenniferrpovey:

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ
This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall
it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.
They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.
And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.
And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.
Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.
So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.
Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).
This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

THIS is an incredible display of human knowledge and ingenuity.

obviouslybenhughes:

jenniferrpovey:

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.

They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.

And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.

And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.

Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.

So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.

Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).

This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

THIS is an incredible display of human knowledge and ingenuity.

Source: ultrafacts

29th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from People of Color in European Art History with 2,119 notes

medievalpoc:

bilt2tumble:

medievalpoc:

Studio of Francis Harwood (in Italy)

Portrait Bust of a Black Man

England, Italy (1758)

Black Stone and Yellow Siena Marble, 2 ft. 3 1/2 in. x 1 ft. 7 3/4 in. x 10 1/2 in.

Info via Getty Museum:

With noble bearing, this man proudly holds his chin high above his powerful chest. Sculptor Francis Harwood chose a black stone to reproduce the sitter’s skin tone. Harwood also chose an unusual antique format for the bust, terminating it in a wide arc below the man’s pectoral muscles. Harwood was familiar with antique sculptures from time spent in Florence reproducing and copying them. He may have deliberately used this elegant, rounded termination, which includes the entire, unclothed chest and shoulders, to evoke associations with ancient busts of notable men. Although the identity of the sitter is unknown, the scar on his face suggests that this is a portrait of a specific individual. This work may be one of the earliest sculpted portraits of a Black individual by a European.*

* I think we should all know by now that this is definitely untrue.

PDF with information for educators from the Getty Museum

…And the fact that the last line (struck out above) was included AT ALL is telling. Details folks. DETAILS.

Nearly every work featuring a “Black individual” in European art has the same claim written by the museum writer/curator. 

I hope this post clears up any confusion about that.

29th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Hey there, Cher with 179,121 notes

atop-the-treetop:

sizvideos:

Video

This is one of those ideas where some person was like “Hehe, this might  be silly.” And then struck fucking gold.

Source: sizvideos

29th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Mic with 13,894 notes

micdotcom:

35 intense photos capture protesters’ struggle for democracy in Hong Kong

Follow micdotcom 

29th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Hey there, Cher with 67,166 notes

gwen-fit:

huffingtonpost:

Matt Damon Does Ice Bucket Challenge With Toilet Water For 800 Million Without Clean H2O

Matt Damon was conflicted when friends Jimmy Kimmel and Ben Affleck called on him to complete the ALS ice bucket challenge.

Find out who Damon challenges here. 

HOLY SHIT THIS IS THE BEST THING

Source: huffingtonpost